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Newsletter: African Terrorism Bulletin Issue 4
13 September 2005
 

 

September 2005 | Issue 004


Welcome to the fourth edition of the African Terrorism Bulletin. The quarterly newsletter is produced by the Organised Crime and Corruption Programme of the Institute for Security Studies (ISS). The aim is to provide balanced information, analysis and critical perspectives regarding news on terrorism and counter-terrorism strategies on the African continent.

The information in this and future African Terrorism Bulletins will be based on ‘open source` information. Commenting on developments relating to terrorism remains a sensitive issue. The Bulletin will endeavour to steer through the different agendas that form part of the discourse on terrorism in a critical and balanced way. Different sections focus on terrorism in the news, state responses and critical perspectives. Most of the information focuses on issues around terrorism as they relate to the African continent, yet, due to the transnational nature of the phenomenon, issues from further afield are not ignored.

Comments, contributions and critiques from our readers are encouraged. Please feel free to pass this newsletter on to anyone who you think may be interested in the content of the African Terrorism Bulletin. To subscribe please send an e-mail to terrorism@issct.org.za .

 CONTENTS

 


East Africa`s terror ties
UN Security Council leaves Somalia arms ban intact
Egypt hit by the worst terrorist attack since the 1980s
Study: AIDS a greater global security threat than terrorism?
Alleged terror financier operates in plain sight
Mozambique detains Pakistani nationals with huge stash of cash
Zambia deports terror suspect to Britain
Draft anti - terrorism legislation approved in N igeria
SARPCCO to set up border intelligence system
Mauritius and South Africa sign convention against nuclear terrorism
New UN resolution on terrorist ‘incitement`
South Africa leads Financial Action Task Force (FATF)
East African states embark on counter-terrorism drills
“Africa needs to develop its navies”
Comoros ratification of anti-terrorism conventions in the pipeline
Southern Africa: Strategic base for international terrorism?
ISS seminar: Terrorism in sub-Saharan Africa
ISS seminar: Terrorism in Africa
PAGAD: A case study of radical Islam in South Africa
After London: Reassessing Africa`s role in the War on Terror
Survey on South African attitudes towards tolerance, security and terrorism
ISS vacancies in Addis Ababa: IGAD Counter-Terrorism Project

 EDITORIAL

 


Since the distribution of the last edition of the African Terrorism Bulletin, the world has witnessed terrorist attacks on the London transport system. The attacks left 56 people dead, and more than 700 injured. In the current edition of the newsletter, we take a look at the African connection to the London bombings.

Three of the chief suspects held in connection with the failed London bombings on 21 July were born in East Africa (refer to “East Africa`s terror ties” in the ‘Top Story` section). The country of birth of the suspects may be coincidental, but this is the topic of another debate. In July 2005, Zambian authorities captured and deported to the United Kingdom, alleged mastermind of the London bombings Haroon Rashid Aswat (read “Zambia deports terror suspect to Britain” in the ‘State Responses` section), also accused of plotting to set up a training camp in Bly, Oregon in 1999. Investigators found that Aswat had spent time in South Africa, and had travelled to Botswana and Mozambique before his arrest.

The link of terror suspects to the African continent has reopened the old debate of whether developing countries in Africa and elsewhere in the world provide sanctuary for international fugitives and terrorists. Readers are encouraged to follow up on the debate in the ‘Critical Perspectives` section.

In the aftermath of the July bomb blasts in London, there has been renewed concern around the scope and success rate of global anti-terrorism measures. Opinion polls showed that an overwhelming majority of Britons (86% of those questioned) would support tough new measures to reduce the threat of attacks after the London bombings. According to a Guardian/ICM poll, almost three-quarters of the UK population are happy to give up civil liberties in order to make Great Britain safer from terrorist attacks. It is perhaps not surprising then that the London bombings led to British Prime Minister Tony Blair`s announcement of a series of new anti-terrorism measures. These include the deportation of foreign nationals who claim that the use of “violence to further a person`s beliefs” is acceptable, as well as measures authorising the denaturalisation of British citizens who engage in “extremism”.

Government and opposition parties in the UK have forged broad agreement on the political response to the London attacks. Three significant laws were agreed in principle. A new offence of “acts preparatory to terrorism” will give law enforcement officials more scope to deal with those they suspect of extremism. A law banning the “providing or receiving of terrorist training” is aimed at terrorist training camps in foreign countries. Perhaps the most controversial and dramatic law will be the prohibition on glorifying or inciting terrorism (compare with the story “New UN resolution on terrorist ‘incitement`” in the ‘State Responses` section).

Yet, tougher anti-terror laws bring with them a surrender of certain basic freedoms that citizens in liberal democratic states are accustomed to. This may for example include infringements on freedoms of association, religion, media and expression, and basic rights to privacy and a fair trial.

N igeria is in the process of passing anti-terrorism legislation into law; while many other countries on the African continent are in the process of developing dedicated anti-terror laws. Before agreeing to tough anti-terrorism measures, African people should make sure that the laws are designed to fight terrorism, and terrorism alone. There is a danger that state authorities use anti-terror laws to persecute minorities (Zimbabwe) or majorities (the apartheid government). Mindful of this practise, in many cases it may suffice to domesticate obligations as set out in the thirteen international conventions dealing with terrorism.

 TOP STORY

 


East Africa`s terror ties
August 3 2005 - Reports that three of the chief suspects held in connection with the failed London bombings on 21 July were born in East Africa have once again put the region in the spotlight.

Connections between East Africa and al Qaeda have long been established. There are frequent reports of terror cells operating in the sub-region, especially in Somalia. The links to al Qaeda date to 1991, when Osama bin Laden set up training camps in Sudan before moving to Afghanistan.

A new report by the Belgian-based think tank, the International Crisis Group (ICG), details a new al Qaeda linked group in Somalia. Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi also talks of an active al Qaeda cell in Somalia. The leaders of al Ittihad al Islamia (AIAI) were trained in Afghanistan. The group has been blamed for kidnapping foreign aid workers, and carrying out a number of assassinations in Somalia.

ICG analysts identify extreme poverty, lax security, porous borders, proliferation of weapons and the growing influence of Islamic extremists as key to rendering the Horn of Africa a fertile recruiting ground for terrorists. Thus, terrorist networks are said to be attracted to the Horn of Africa and East Africa because conditions in emerging democracies allow terrorists a level of freedom that enables them to move around undetected.

East Africa has suffered three deadly al Qaeda linked attacks since 1998, including the US embassy bombings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam. A 2002 suicide bombing of a tourist resort in Mombassa coincided with a separate missile attack against an Israeli airliner in Kenya. In 1993, members of the Somali terror group, al Ittihad, took partial credit for downing two US Black Hawk helicopters in the Somali capital Mogadishu, an incident that led to the eventual pull-out of US forces from Somalia.

The ICG states that “the threat of Jihadi terrorism from Somalia can only be addressed through the restoration of stable, legitimate and functional government”. Hence, a successful counter-terrorism strategy requires helping Somalia with the twin tasks of reconciliation and state building.

The report has an interesting by-line though: Few Somalis are said to believe that there are terrorists in their country, and many regard American counter-terrorism initiatives as an assault on Islam. Unidentified surveillance flights, the abduction of innocent people for weeks at a time on suspicion of terrorist links, and cooperation with unpopular faction leaders all add to public cynicism and resentment. Hence, without public support, even the most sophisticated counter-terrorism is doomed to failure.
Download the ICG Report No.95 “Counter-Terrorism In Somalia: Losing Hearts and Minds?”
Read the News24.com article
Read the Guardian Unlimited article

For further reading on terrorism in the Horn of Africa and East Africa:
Download the US Institute of Peace Special Report “Terrorism in the Horn of Africa”
Download the Foreign Service Journal article “Fighting Terrorism in East Africa and the Horn”
Read the Voice of America article
Read the Scotsman article

UN Security Council leaves Somalia arms ban intact
July 15 2005 - The United Nations Security Council (UNSC) has turned down a request by the African Union (AU) to lift an arms embargo against Somalia. The AU had requested an exemption from the 1992 weapons embargo, so it can bring arms into Somalia for a peacekeeping force that would also protect the country`s transitional government. The estimated 10 000 troops would derive from seven East African nations. Despite the arms ban, weapons continue to flow unchecked across Somalia`s borders. Nonetheless, the Security Council welcomed the peace initiative from the AU, but remained strict in its request for a detailed plan of the peacekeeping operation before reconsidering.
Read the Alertnet article

 TERRORISM IN THE NEWS

 


Egypt hit by the worst terrorist attack since the 1980s
September 2005 - Egyptian authorities have launched a sweep of the Sinai Peninsula to track those behind a string of bomb attacks in the Sinai Peninsula. Hundreds of suspects are reported to have been arrested, since 3500 police officers began their search. On July 23, 2005, multiple suicide bombings rocked through shopping and hotel areas in the popular Red Sea resort Sharm el-Sheik, killing 88 people and injuring more than 200. In the worst attack in Egypt since 1981, two co-ordinated car bombs went off simultaneously about 4km apart. A third bomb went off a few minutes later near a beachside walkway, where tourists often stroll at night. Three groups issued competing claims that they were behind the bombings. A group citing ties to al Qaeda, calling itself the Abdullah Azzam Brigades made its claim in a statement posted on a website. Hours later, a previously unknown group called the Holy Warriors of Egypt made the same claim, and so did the Unity and Jihad Group. Egyptian investigators have found a possible link with a series of bombings at the Red Sea resort community of Taba in October 2004. The perpetrators employed the same strategy and planning as during the first wave of attacks. Officials also pointed to similarities in the timing and choice of target. Both attacks struck during a busy holiday season and in areas packed with foreign tourists.

Sharm el-Sheik has expanded in recent years, making it a major player in Egypt`s vital tourism industry. The lucrative tourism has slowly recovered since the last attack; it is feared that the latest bombings will deal it a fresh blow.
Read the aljazeera.net article
Read the Mail & Guardian article
Read the Mail & Guardian article

Study: AIDS a greater global security threat than terrorism?
July 23 2005 - According to a study conducted by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), the global AIDS pandemic is a greater threat to international security than terrorism. The study further notes that countries, which are severely hit by this epidemic, are likely to suffer socio-economic and political turmoil, which could impact on neighbouring countries. Thus, the security of the most affluent and powerful states could be affected by the ability of the poorest states to contain the pandemic. The study identifies AIDS as an “enormous stressor that is aggravating the laundry lists of underlying tensions in developing, devolving and failed states.”

US national security advisors have rejected the findings of the study. James Robbins of the National Defence University maintained that AIDS was not a security threat but a health problem. He cited the example of South Africa and Botswana, two of the countries hardest hit by AIDS, yet they are among the continent`s most stable countries.
Download the CFR study
Read the Advocate.com article
Read the Post-Gazette.com article

Alleged terror financier operates in plain sight
June 30 2005 - A N igerian entrepreneur, Ahmed Idris Nasreddin, and his international business interests continue to operate unimpeded despite being designated by the UN Al Qaeda and Taliban Sanctions Committee and the US Treasury Department in August 2002 as a financial supporter of Al Qaeda. In November 2001, US President Bush announced freezing the assets of Nasreddin`s bank, Al Taqwa. It was alleged that the Al Taqwa association of offshore banks and financial management firms have helped al Qaeda to shift money around the world. The UN designation of Nasreddin as a terrorist financier placed an international legal obligation on all countries to freeze his assets and economic resources and to ensure that no funds, financial assets or other economic resources were made available to him, or for his benefit. These designations also listed a number of Nasreddin`s business interests. The funds and resources of these entities were to be frozen. But despite these restrictions, little has been done to put him out of business. A few of his bank accounts were frozen, notably in Switzerland, but no further steps were taken to close down any of his business activities. He continues to operate numerous companies and business ventures in Europe. Nasreddin has denied ever financing terrorism. He is believed to have fled his native Ethiopia and resettled permanently to N igeria. From there, he operates and expands his business interests including land development and housing construction. He serves as the chairperson of the NASCO Group with headquarters in the northern N igerian city of Jos. In fact, a suburb of Jos has been named NASCO TOWN, with a principal street bearing the Nasreddin name.
Read the MSNBC article
Read the N igeria Village Square article

Mozambique detains Pakistani nationals with huge stash of cash
June 30 2005 - The Mozambican police have apprehended four Pakistani nationals, suspected of attempting to export US $240,000 out of the country. The four suspects were arrested in the district of Nhamatanda, on the road from Beira to the Zimbabwean border. One of the suspects, a shop-owner in Beira and Tete claimed that the money belonged to him. Abdul Vayani stated that it was unsafe to leave the money in his Beira home. Many Muslims do not use the formal banking system, as their religion does not allow them to accrue interest on their earnings. Interestingly enough, the suspect declared that only US $ 140 000 were his, while the remaining money belonged to a Pakistani national, Atif Polami, who resides in Dubai. Vayani claimed that the money was collected from Mozambican traders and was entrusted to him by Polami. Law enforcement authorities have not ruled out terrorist financing.
Read the Migration News article

 STATE RESPONSES

 


Zambia deports terror suspect to Britain
August 07 2005 - Zambian authorities arrested the alleged mastermind of the London bombings, Haroon Rashid Aswat, on 20 July 2005, after he entered the country on 6 July 2005. Aswat was tracked down in Zambia after a tip-off was received from the US anti-terrorism unit. The suspect`s mobile phone had received about twenty calls from the London bombing suspects. Furthermore, a charge filed before a New York court accused Aswat of seeking to establish a terrorist training camp in a remote area in the north-western US state of Oregon, hostage taking in Yemen and funding terrorist training in Afghanistan. Aswat has been on the run since 1999. Following his arrest in Zambia, British officials were anxious to interview Aswat because of concerns that he could be taken to one of the centres where the US holds terrorists. Martin Mubangu, a British Muslim, was similarly arrested in Zambia in 2002 and taken to the US detention camp in Guatanamo Bay, where he was held without charge until his release in 2005.In the end, Zambia deported Aswat, who is a British citizen, back to London on 7 August 2005. The central African nation turned down a US request for Aswat`s extradition, citing that the suspect was a British national, and it would hence be proper to hand him over to the British government.

UK authorities detained the suspect upon his arrival in London after being deported from Zambia. In the aftermath of Aswat`s arrest, it transpired that American intelligence officials attempted to seize the terror suspect in South Africa a few weeks earlier, and secretly shift him to an undisclosed third country for interrogation. British officials were unwilling to participate in the controversial American policy of the “rendition” of one of their own citizens. Usually, “rendition” involves moving detainees to US-friendly Arab countries such as Egypt, where local interrogators are said to use torture to extract information.
Read the Forbes article
Read the BBC News article
Read the Mail & Guardian article
Read the Globe and Mail article
Read the Voice of America article

Draft anti - terrorism legislation approved in N igeria
September 01 2005 - N igeria`s cabinet has approved a draft anti-terrorism law and sent it to the National Assembly for consideration and enactment into law. N igeria has never been a victim of international terrorism but a number of domestic groups have been involved in the ethnic, political and sectarian violence, which has left more than 20 000 people dead in the past six years.

Only a partial copy of the draft bill has been made available to the public. Under the new law anyone convicted of a terrorist offence can be sentenced to up to 35 years in jail. In addition, the director general of the state security service, the country`s feared security police, would be able to ask a federal judge to ban an organisation if two or more people are deemed to have come together to commit, prepare or promote acts of terrorism. The draft bill employs a wide definition of terrorism. According to the Information Minister, Frank Nweke, the draft bill represented a proactive measure to tackle terrorism by the N igerian government, and was not born out of pressure from the United States government.
Read the Africast Global Africa Network article
Read the news24.com article
Read the This Day article on allafrica.com

SARPCCO to set up border intelligence system
August 03 2005 - The Southern African Regional Police Chiefs Co-operation Organisation (SARPCCO) will set up a border intelligence body. This was announced by SARPCCO acting chairperson, the Angolan Commissioner of Police José Alfredo Ekuikui at the end of the tenth annual conference of the organisation held in the Angolan capital of Luanda in early August 2005. Members states have agreed to strengthen cooperation on combating cross-border crime in the region. This will include the mutual exchange of information and joint law enforcement operations at common borders. Each SARPPCO member country is required to outline appropriate measures on the prevention of cross border crime and exert the necessary control over crime within its borders.

Meanwhile, Kenyan National Security Minister John Michuki has requested police chiefs in East Africa to tackle terrorism and proliferation of small arms in the region. Michuki appealed to police chiefs attending the 7th Eastern Africa Police Chiefs Co-operation Organisation (EAPCCO) in the Kenyan port of Mombassa to address cross-border theft of motor vehicles and cattle rustling. He also pledged conference delegates to conceive of resolutions, which would facilitate the extradition of fugitives.
Read the Angola Press article
Read the Angola Press article
Read the East African Standard article on allafrica.com

Mauritius and South Africa sign convention against nuclear terrorism
September 15 2005 - Mauritius and South Africa have signed the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism, which opened for signature on the 14th September 2005. The two African countries have joined 61 nations from around the world in acknowledging the danger of terrorists gaining access to nuclear weapons. The Convention obliges governments to punish those who illegally possess atomic devices or radioactive materials. Based on an instrument originally proposed by the Russian Federation in 1998, it provides a definition of acts of nuclear terrorism and covers a broad range of possible targets, including those against power plants and nuclear reactors. Under its provisions, the alleged offenders must be either extradited or prosecuted. Furthermore, states are encouraged to cooperate in preventing terrorist attacks by sharing information and assisting each other in connection with criminal investigations and extradition proceedings. The treaty needs to be ratified by at least twenty-two states before it becomes international law.
Read the News24.com article
Read the story in the last African Terrorism Bulletin
Download the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism

New UN resolution on terrorist ‘incitement`
September 04 2005 - The United Nations Security Council unanimously approved a resolution urging states to take action against those who “incite” terrorism. The resolution also requires states to deny safe haven to anyone involved in terrorism and to strengthen travel controls to combat movement of terrorists. The resolution arose from a British initiative, spurred on by the country`s response to terrorist attacks on the London transport system in July. The resolution also calls upon all states to continue efforts to enhance dialogue and broaden understanding among cultures to prevent indiscriminate targeting of different religions. Furthermore, it stresses that states must comply with international human rights law, refugee law and humanitarian law.
Read the Gulf News article
Read the globalsecurity.org article

South Africa leads Financial Action Task Force (FATF)
July 01 2005 - South Africa has assumed presidency of the 33-nation Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering (FATF). The inter-governmental body was established by the G-8 in 1989 in response to mounting concern over money laundering and in recognition of the threat posed to banking systems and financial institutions worldwide. Former South African education minister, Kader Asmal, will serve as the president of the FATF until June 2006.
Read the Diamonds.Net article

East African states embark on counter-terrorism drills
September 2005 - Hundreds of troops from Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda joined up in an East African Community (EAC) counter-terrorism exercise at the Karen Defence College, south of Nairobi. Around 150 officers and more than 100 soldiers participated in Operation “Trend Marker” which aims to boost the sub-region`s ability to combat terrorism. Anti-terrorism officials from the United States and observers from Rwanda and Burundi, who have applied to join EAC, also attended.
Read the article on the Horn of Africa website

“Africa needs to develop its navies”
August 29 2005 - At a recent symposium on sea power in Africa, South African Intelligence Minister Ronnie Kasrils recommended that Africa should develop its navies to a level where the continent could combat international terrorism, drug smugglers and piracy. The number of pirate attacks worldwide has tripled in the past decade, and new evidence suggests that piracy is becoming a key tactic of terrorist groups. Delegates from 24 African navies were attending the three-day symposium held in Cape Town. According to Kasrils, maritime and naval power was more important today than in the past for Africa, which depended heavily on sea-borne trade. Offshore oil and gas resources also had to be protected. In addition, there was no hindrance to terrorists attacking maritime targets such as harbours. There could be no development without security on the continent. There hence was a need for navies to participate in peace-support operations, during which they were a key element in transporting forces, conducting surveillance and supporting ground forces. Given the fact that Africa had an enormous coastline and small navies, countries should exchange military intelligence and information.
Read the News24.com article
Additional information from Foreign Affairs

Comoros ratification of anti-terrorism conventions in the pipeline
July 18 2005 - The Indian Ocean archipelago, the Comoros, has announced its intention to ratify five international conventions on counter-terrorism by end of the year. Speaking at a seminar on security in the Indian Ocean region, Comoros Attorney General Jaffar Ahmed announced that the measures would be submitted to parliament for approval as part of the islands` contribution to the US-led campaign against terrorism. Comoros has attracted the attention of US investigators following the trail of a suspected al Qaeda agent. Comoran-born Fazul Abdullah Mohammed is accused of organising the 1998 bombings of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania and an attack on an Israeli-owned hotel in the Kenyan port of Mombassa. Fazul was reportedly seen in Comoros in October 2004, but this was difficult to verify due to Comoros` limited intelligence resources.
Read the Emergency Net News article

 CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

 


Southern Africa: Strategic base for international terrorism?
One terror suspect sold Islamic CDs and DVDs at flea markets outside Johannesburg, South Africa. Another worked at a hamburger outlet, blending into a country where international fugitives abuse the long porous borders, opportunities for money laundering and forged passports for sale. The arrests of two alleged terrorists, a US embassy bomber and a man accused of plotting to set up a training camp in the United States, have international and national authorities investigating whether al Qaeda is using southern Africa as a base to raise funds, recruit supporters and provide logistical support for global attacks.

In July 2005, Zambian authorities captured and deported to the United Kingdom Haroon Rashid Aswat (read “Zambia deports terror suspect to Britain” in the State Responses section), accused of plotting to set up a training camp in Bly, Oregon in 1999. Investigators found that Aswat had spent time in South Africa, and had travelled to Botswana and Mozambique before his arrest. In 1999, Khalfan Khamis Mohamed was arrested in Cape Town and deported to the United States. He has been jailed for life for his role in the 1998 bombings of the US embassies in Tanzania and Kenya. The Tanzanian had entered South Africa under an alias, got a temporary residency permit, and worked at a hamburger place for months until he tried to renew his permit and got caught.

There are a few other examples in the sub-region. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that South African security forces, opinion and government leaders warn that the region must step up anti-terrorism measures or it could become a target itself. South African Intelligence Minister Ronnie Kasrils voiced his concern: “There are groups in Africa that claim to be part of al Qaeda and other structures, and here in southern Africa they have been discovered seeking refuge and quite possibly attempting to set up networks.”

Wanted terrorists like Aswat and Mohamed are said to blend into South Africa`s diverse population. The country has modern banks, good roads, airlines and telecommunications, which could prove useful when planning for terrorist activities. South African government officials acknowledge that al Qaeda suspects and their associates have obtained South African passports in the past, which allow travel to many African countries and the United Kingdom without visas.

Traditionally failed or anarchic states were linked to housing terrorists and other fugitives. Yet, empirical data seems to disprove this. Richard Cornwell from the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) maintains that terrorist cells would not base themselves in failed states such as Somalia. Terrorist groupings would rather choose to operate from within open and multi-racial societies such as South Africa with a huge population of immigrants. They would be on the look out for countries with a stable infrastructure (finance and communication so that they keep in touch with each other) and organisational sophistication.

Furthermore, South Africa has well-developed financial and banking sectors with links to developed countries. These offer exploitable opportunities for the laundering of money, which may be used to finance terrorist attacks. South African points-of-entry (ports, harbours, airports) are not properly guarded, which creates another favourable condition for terrorists to penetrate the country`s security system.

Whether southern Africa, and South Africa in specific, is more attractive to terrorists than other sub-regions on the African continent is a question of opinion, as there is no data to corroborate this. In a world, where globalisation has become order of the day, it is suffices to say that no country can claim to be unaffected by transnational criminal and/or terrorist elements.
This section is mostly based on the UK Guardian article

For further reading on the topic:
Read the GlobalSecurity.org article
Read the Voice of America article
Read the Business Day article
Read the Mail&Guardian article

 ANNOUNCEMENTS

 


ISS seminar: Terrorism in sub-Saharan Africa
The ISS is hosting a seminar on 3 October 2005, 10h30, at its Pretoria offices. Professor James Lutz from the Indiana University-Purdue University will present a review of terrorism in sub-Saharan Africa.
Visit the ISS website for more details

ISS seminar: Terrorism in Africa
A further ISS seminar entitled “Terrorism in Africa: African Union`s Perception of the Threat and Measures to Prevent and Combat Terrorism” is presented on 18 October 2005, 10h00 at the Pretoria offices of the ISS. H.E. Ambassador Abdelhamid Boubazine, the director of the African Centre for the Study and Research on Terrorism (ACSRT) will speak on the role, structure and activities of the Centre in light of the perceived terrorist threat. Martin Ewi from the African Union (AU) will provide an overview of the threat of terrorism on the continent and the role and activities of the AU in the prevention and combating of terrorism.For more details, visit
Visit the ISS website for more details

PAGAD: A case study of radical Islam in South Africa
Anneli Botha contends that the threat of Islamic terrorism to South Africa is real. Aside from the possibility of an al Qaeda strike against US and other Western interests in the country, there are a number of indigenous Islamic networks that have the potential to engage in terrorist activities on their own or in conjunction with international terrorists. In this paper, the emergence, evolution and threats posed by People Against Gangsterism and Drugs (PAGAD) is highlighted.
Download the paper contained in the Terrorism Monitor

After London: Reassessing Africa`s role in the War on Terror
Kurt Shillinger argues that the current War on Terror has taken on global dimensions; with Africa being one of the key theatres in this struggle. No US strategy that fails to reckon with Africa`s role can be successful. According to Shillinger, the Bush administration and its allies are coming to realise this but have yet to address the full implications of the problem.
Download the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research paper

Survey on South African attitudes towards tolerance, security and terrorism
Research Surveys conducted a telephone study in July 2005 to probe attitudes and perceptions amongst South Africans towards issues around tolerance, security and terrorism.
Download the Research Surveys study

ISS vacancies in Addis Ababa: IGAD Counter-Terrorism Project
The ISS plans to open an office in Addis Ababa to implement an IGAD project on countering terrorism in the sub-region. The following positions are available: Head of Project, Senior Legal Analyst, Senior Counter Terrorism Expert, Senior Training Coordinator and Field Researcher. The closing date is 15 October 2005.
Visit the ISS website for more details

Please inform us of upcoming terrorism meetings, seminars, workshops, conferences, publications and other developments annette@issct.org.za

 ABOUT THE ISS

 


The Institute for Security Studies (ISS) is an applied policy non-profit research organisation with a focus on human security issues on the African continent.

This newsletter is produced by the terrorism component which is located within the ISS Organised Crime and Corruption programme in Cape Town and funded by the Royal Norwegian Government.

 EDITORIAL TEAM

 


Annette Hà¼bschle (Researcher: Terrorism and Organised Crime) - annette@issct.org.za
Mxolisi Makinana (ISS Research Intern)


Institute for Security Studies
67 Roeland Street, Drury Lane, Gardens, Cape Town 8001, South Africa
Tel +27 (0)21 461-7211 • Fax +27 (0)21 461-7213
www.issafrica.org • terrorism@issct.org.za

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