ISS Africa
Home / About us / Press releases / ISS Media Advisory: SAPS Amendment Bill
ISS Media Advisory: SAPS Amendment Bill
23 April 2012

 

MEDIA ADVISORY FROM THE INSTITUTE FOR SECURITY STUDIES (ISS)

Monday 23 April 2012

The Institute for Security Studies (ISS) will on Tuesday 24 April be giving evidence to the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Police hearings on the SA Police Services (SAPS) Amendment Bill.  

The draft legislation is a response to the Constitutional Court ruling in 2011 that the legislation which created the Hawks does not sufficiently provide for an independent anti-corruption agency.

For interviews or a briefing with ISS researchers please call Jonathon Rees on 076 185 1827 or mail Jonathon@proofcommunication.com

Speaking ahead of the hearings, ISS Crime and Justice Programme head Gareth Newham said:

“South Africa has a corruption problem and we need and deserve a powerful and independent anti-corruption agency which is insulated from political interference. Parliament now has the opportunity to pass the legislation which will create that agency. 

 “The R30bn lost to corruption in South Africa every year is all the evidence we need for the creation of a robust and independent anti-corruption agency. This is R30bn of tax payers’ money which is stolen every year when it should be used to pay salaries, build schools, hospitals, houses and roads, and to create jobs and infrastructure which benefit all South Africans. Corruption affects every South African, and it affects the poor and unemployed most directly.

“The SAPS Amendment Bill does not create an anti-corruption agency capable of really tackling one of the biggest problems facing South Africa today. The bill in its current form does not meet the minimum requirements of the ruling by the Constitutional Court.

“An anti-corruption agency needs to be able to investigate the police and the government – as well as the private sector - and to do that it needs to be independent of the police and free from the possibility of government interference. The agency needs to be able to fearlessly investigate corrupt practices while protecting honest politicians and civil servants. The South African public need to have confidence in the independence of the anti-corruption agency – and people won’t be able to trust an agency if there is a way for politicians to influence the way it operates or to meddle in its investigations.

“The SAPS Amendment Bill does not fulfil South Africa’s international obligations. South Africa has signed UN, SADC and AU protocols to guarantee we will prevent and counter corruption by establishing an investigation agency that is free from any type of political interference.

“We are failing ourselves, Africa and the world if we don’t use this opportunity to show leadership and demonstrate that we are serious about stopping corruption by creating a robust and independent anti-corruption agency

The ISS is an independent research and policy development institution. It is the biggest African non-government organisation.

For interviews or a briefing with ISS researchers please call Jonathon Rees on 076 185 1827 or mail Jonathon@proofcommunication.com

ENDS

 

?>